House GOP Leadership

Better Way for Health Care

Your only insurance options would likely include higher cost-sharing and narrower coverage than under the ACA, even if you could afford premiums above your subsidy. And if you had a break in coverage, your insurance could become much more expensive.

Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah)

Patient CARE Act

Your only insurance options would likely include higher cost-sharing and narrower coverage than under the ACA, even if you could afford premiums above your subsidy. And if you had a break in coverage, you could be charged more or denied coverage.

Rep. Tom Price (R-Ga.)

Empowering Patients First Act

Your only insurance options would likely include higher cost-sharing and narrower coverage than under the ACA, even if you could afford premiums above your subsidy. And if you had a break in coverage, your insurance could become much more expensive.

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.)

Health Care Choice Act

It would be hard for you to get covered — your policy options would likely be narrow, you wouldn’t get any assistance to afford premiums and you could be charged a lot or denied coverage because of your pre-existing condition.

Your insurance options could have lower benefits and higher deductibles.

This plan would implement the continuous coverage requirement, making comprehensive plans financially unsustainable for insurance companies.

Your insurance options could have lower benefits and higher deductibles.

In addition to a continuous coverage requirement, the plan would create a low-benefit ‘default’ health plan where uninsured people would get coverage funded by the government. Comprehensive plans would still likely be unsustainable.

Your insurance options could have lower benefits and higher deductibles.

This plan would implement the continuous coverage requirement, making comprehensive plans financially unsustainable for insurance companies.

Many of your insurance options would likely have limited benefits and high deductibles, though the extent is controversial among analysts.

The mandate would be eliminated and there would be no mechanism to keep healthy people enrolled in insurance. Like before the ACA, the lack of healthy people would likely drive non-group coverage to be less comprehensive.

See full article Washington Post 1.17.2017

Trump, GOP Lawmakers Pump The Brakes On Replacement Amid Political Backlash

The president walked back his promises to rapidly dismantle the health law and Republicans on Capitol Hill are now using tamer rhetoric when they talk about “repair” instead of “replace.”

The New York Times: From ‘Repeal’ To ‘Repair’: Campaign Talk On Health Law Meets Reality
Asked at a confirmation hearing two weeks ago if he was working with President Trump on a secret plan to replace the Affordable Care Act, Representative Tom Price, Mr. Trump’s nominee for secretary of health and human services, smiled broadly and answered: “It’s true that he said that, yes.” The committee room, filled with health care lobbyists, consumer advocates and others with a vital stake in the future of the health care law, erupted with knowing laughter at Mr. Price’s careful formulation. (Shear and Pear, 2/6)

KPBS: Trump, GOP Reverse Course On Speedy Obamacare Repeal 
President Trump and some Republicans in Congress are backing off on their pledge to immediately repeal the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, soon. During the presidential campaign, Trump repeatedly promised to get rid of Obamacare as soon as he took office. The president still calls the act a disaster, but now says Congress might not repeal it until next year. (Bowen, 2/7)

In other national health care news —

Politico: Trump Administration Weighs Obamacare Changes Sought By Insurers
The Trump administration is considering major changes to Obamacare that may help convince insurers to remain in the law’s marketplaces while Congress drafts a replacement plan — but the proposals may also limit enrollment and increase costs for older Americans, according to documents obtained by POLITICO. The administration is looking to alter rules around insurers charging older customers more, how much cost they can shift onto customers, and who’s allowed to sign up outside the standard enrollment window. They represent changes that the industry had previously asked the Obama administration to make. (Diamond, Haberkorn and Demko, 2/6)

McClatchy: Obamacare Repeal Would Kill Millions Of Jobs Nationwide 
It may not crash the economy, but repealing key provisions of the Affordable Care Act would certainly create job losses in every state. That’s the consensus of a growing body of studies that suggest the economic fallout from the health law’s partial demise would ripple through the entire economy, not just the health care sector. Josh Bivens, Director of Research at the Economic Policy Institute, estimates the proposed repeal would eliminate nearly 1.2 million jobs in 2019. (Pugh, 2/7)

 

 

What will a Republication Replacement Plan look like?

Republicans Promise To Tackle Repeal And Replace By End Of March

Congressional Republicans are meeting with the president in Philadelphia to discuss plans to dismantle the health law. They’ve set an aggressive timetable, after admitting they’re going to miss the previous one — Jan. 27 — that they set for themselves.

The Associated Press: Congressional Republicans Sketch Ambitious Agenda
Congressional Republicans laid plans Wednesday to act on a health care repeal bill by the end of March and rewrite the tax code by August as they sketched out an ambitious agenda for their first 200 days under President Donald Trump. Meeting in Philadelphia for their annual policy retreat, they also discussed action to raise the nation’s borrowing limit, write an infrastructure package sought by Trump and push funding for defense and border priorities. (1/25)

The Washington Post: Republicans Set Aggressive Agenda On Health Care, Regulations And Tax Reform
In an afternoon session at an annual GOP policy retreat, House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (Wis.) and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.) unveiled plans that put repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act as the first order of business, with the target date for action within the next three months. Lawmakers also plan to move quickly on a broad rewrite of the tax code that is expected to include deep cuts in tax rates. The agenda sets a vigorous pace in an attempt to make good on key campaign promises made by President Trump. (Snell and DeBonis, 1/25)

The Wall Street Journal: GOP Acknowledges It Won’t Meet Self-Imposed Deadline To Repeal Obamacare
Two days before Republicans’ self-imposed deadline for producing legislation to repeal the Affordable Care Act, GOP lawmakers acknowledged they were unlikely to meet it. Both the GOP-controlled House and Senate passed budgets this month requiring four committees to deliver proposals by Jan. 27 to roll back major tenets of the 2010 health-care law. (Peterson, 1/25)

Reuters: Health Insurers Quietly Shape Obamacare Replacement With Fewer Risks
U.S. health insurers are making their case to Republican lawmakers over how Americans sign up for individual insurance and pushing for other changes to shape the replacement of former President Barack Obama’s national healthcare law. The health insurers, including Independence Blue Cross and Molina Healthcare Inc, are also recommending ways to put more control over insurance in the hands of states as the federal oversight of Obamacare is dismantled. They emphasize that it is crucial to keep government subsidies for low income people. (Humer, 1/25)

 

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